sCROKka la notizia!
madonnaliberaprofessionista:

Il commento che mia sorella ha trovato on line ed ha salvato perché lo potessi leggere in diretta a “La Zanzara”.Non sono più stato in grado di ritrovare l’autore (credo abbia il cancellato il commento poco dopo averlo scritto)."Spero che chiunque tu sia, almeno tu, possa fuggire da questo posto; spero che il mondo cambi e le cose vadano meglio ma quello che spero più di ogni altra cosa è che tu capisca cosa intendo quando dico che anche se non ti conosco, anche se non ti conoscerò mai, anche se non riderò, e non piangerò con te, e non ti bacerò, mai… io ti amo, dal più profondo del cuore… io ti amo.Valerie.”

madonnaliberaprofessionista:

Il commento che mia sorella ha trovato on line ed ha salvato perché lo potessi leggere in diretta a “La Zanzara”.
Non sono più stato in grado di ritrovare l’autore (credo abbia il cancellato il commento poco dopo averlo scritto).

"Spero che chiunque tu sia, almeno tu, possa fuggire da questo posto; spero che il mondo cambi e le cose vadano meglio ma quello che spero più di ogni altra cosa è che tu capisca cosa intendo quando dico che anche se non ti conosco, anche se non ti conoscerò mai, anche se non riderò, e non piangerò con te, e non ti bacerò, mai… io ti amo, dal più profondo del cuore… io ti amo.

Valerie.”

ze-violet:

E Morgan Freemannnnn vinceee tuttoooo

(sì esagero le vocali, una volta nella vita. Questa)

KARACHI, Pakistan — When I heard that the fourth season of Showtime’s “Homeland” would be set in Pakistan and Afghanistan, I awaited its season premiere with anticipation and trepidation. A major American television show would be portraying events set in my country, but I knew those events would be linked to the only thing that seems to interest the world’s eye: terrorism and how Islamist extremism affects Americans and the West.

As advertising for the season premiere was heating up, a short essay by an American writer and activist, Laura Durkay, appeared on The Washington Post’s website under the headline “Homeland Is the Most Bigoted Show on Television.” Ms. Durkay wrote, “The entire structure of ‘Homeland’ is built on mashing together every manifestation of political Islam, Arabs, Muslims and the whole Middle East into a Frankenstein-monster global terrorist threat that simply doesn’t exist.”

The show’s reputation along those lines had kept me away, even as I longed to examine Claire Danes’s portrayal of Carrie Mathison as a conflicted C.I.A. agent immersed in a male-dominated world, and engaging with Middle Eastern and Muslim characters. How could the show’s creators have dreamed up such a complex protagonist, while depicting the sociopolitical milieu in which so many of its characters exist with so little nuance?

Yes, Hollywood isn’t known for historical accuracy or impartial portrayals of any fictionalized “other.” But I still couldn’t resist trying to see what Pakistan, my homeland, looked like through its eyes. I’m a writer of fiction, so I know about imagined worlds. You look not for complete truthfulness, but for verisimilitude — the “appearance of being true” — so it can give your art authenticity, credibility, believability. And we in Pakistan long to be seen with a vision that at least approaches the truth.

Pakistan has long been said to have an image problem, a kind way to say that the world sees us one-dimensionally — as a country of terrorists and extremists, conservatives who enslave women and stone them to death, and tricky scoundrels who hate Americans and lie pathologically to our supposed allies. In Pakistan, we’ve long attributed the ubiquity of these images to what we believe is biased journalism, originating among mainstream American journalists who care little for depth and accuracy. By the time these tropes filter down into popular culture, and have morphed into the imaginings of showbiz writers, we’ve gone from an image problem to the realm of Jungian archetypes and haunting traumatized psyches.

Whenever a Western movie contains a connection to Pakistan, we watch it in a sadomasochistic way, eager and nervous to see how the West observes us. We look to see if we come across to you as monsters, and then to see what our new, monstrous face looks like. Again and again, we see a refracted, distorted image of our homeland staring back at us. We know we have monsters among us, but this isn’t what we look like to ourselves.

There have been previous international attempts to portray Pakistan on film: “A Mighty Heart,” about the kidnapping and murder of Daniel Pearl; or “Zero Dark Thirty,” about the assassination of Osama bin Laden. The Pearl film was shot largely in India, with some scenes in Pakistan; the Bin Laden film was shot in Jordan and India; in these and other films, streets and shops in India were given nominal Pakistani makeovers, and Indian actors were hired to pass as Pakistanis. In them, I have seen India’s signature homemade Ambassador cars traveling down Pakistani streets; actors who play tribal Pashtuns but look Bihari; Western women wearing chadors where they don’t have to, or going around bareheaded when they should be covered.

In the season premiere of “Homeland,” Carrie Mathison orders an airstrike on a terrorist compound in a Pakistani tribal area bordering Afghanistan. It is utterly surreal for a Pakistani to watch a fictional imagining of the dreaded strike from the viewpoint of the person ordering it in an American control room: the disconnection, the studied casualness, the presenting of a birthday cake afterward. It’s not clear who the monsters are in this scene, even before it’s revealed that the strike hit a wedding party, killing women and children. It’s a moment of obvious reversal, but also of nuance, when I wasn’t expecting it.

Still, the season’s first hour, in which Carrie also goes to Islamabad, offers up a hundred little clues that tell me this isn’t the country where I grew up, or live. When a tribal boy examines the dead in his village, I hear everyone speaking Urdu, not the region’s Pashto. Protesters gather across from the American Embassy in Islamabad, when in reality the embassy is hidden inside a diplomatic enclave to which public access is extremely limited. I find out later that the season was filmed in Cape Town, South Africa, with its Indian Muslim community standing in for Pakistanis.

I realize afterward that I’ve been creating a test, for the creators of “Homeland” and all who would sell an imagined image of Pakistan: If this isn’t really Pakistan, and these aren’t really Pakistanis, then how they see us isn’t really true.

A verse in the Quran says, “Behold, we have created you all out of a male and a female, and have made you into nations and tribes, so that you might come to know one another.” Even after everything that’s happened between us, we in Pakistan still want you to know us, not as you imagine us, but as we really are: flawed, struggling, complex, human. All of us, in the outside world as well as in Pakistan, need art — film and television, story and song — that closes that gap between representation and reality, instead of prying the two further apart.

Bina Shah, a contributing opinion writer, is the author of “A Season for Martyrs.”

All I want is education, and I am afraid of no one
Malala Yousafzai

elvira:

sandandglass:

Bryan Stevenson on The Daily Show.

I want to reblog this three times. Feel free to do the same.


Father and Daughter. Afghanistan. 

Father and Daughter. Afghanistan. 

Più Marino, meno Alfano.

#equalrights

Era l’estate del 2006 quando ebbi la fortuna di vederlo e ascoltarlo dal vivo.

Fu un’emozione bellissima.

Nonostante la mancanza di forze a causa della malattia che da mesi lo stava lentamente consumando, la sua voce riuscì come sempre a trasmettere un qualcosa di indescrivibile.

Morì qualche mese più tardi, esattamente 8 anni fa.

Molti miei amici non sardi lo ricordano per la fantastica performance del 1991 con il resto dei Tazenda e un altro gigante della musica italiana, anch’egli venuto a mancare troppo presto: Pierangelo Bertoli. “Spunta la luna dal monte” fu accolta dal pubblico con un’enorme ovazione e ancor oggi è ricordata come uno dei momenti più toccanti della storia del Festival di Sanremo.

Io vorrei però ricordarlo con una canzone che ha segnato tutta la mia infanzia, una delle canzoni più cariche di significato che la musica della mia terra abbia mai prodotto.

Quel concerto all’anfiteatro romano di Cagliari fu la sua ultima performance, un saluto immenso alla sua terra.

Ciao Andrea.

#IusMigrandi vs. MosMaiorum: social campaign contro controlli e arresti

paoloxl:

image

E’ partita due giorni fa Mos Maiorum, l’operazione di polizia organizzata a livello europeo con l’obiettivo dichiarato di “indebolire la capacità organizzativa del crimine organizzato nel favoreggiamento dell’immigrazione illegale”. Un’operazione che, nel concreto, mira a “identificare”, “controllare”, “arrestare i migranti irregolari”, con il dispiegamento di 18mila uomini delle forze dell’ordine nei maggiori luoghi di passaggio (stazioni, porti, valichi di terra).
Contro questa operazione, molte associazioni si sono attivate per aiutare i cittadini migranti. Sui social è possibile segnalare i controlli usando gli hashtag #StopRaids e #IusMigrandi, aggiungendo il nome della città (ad esempio ‘#StopRaids #Roma: controlli Piazza Vittorio’). Melting Pot Europa ha messo a disposizione alcuni documenti informativi multilingue sui diritti dei cittadini di origine straniera, oltre che un numero di allerta offerto da Watch the Med dedicato a chi attraversa le frontiere.
A livello internazionale, la rete Refugees Welcome ha realizzato una mappatura dei controlli legati a Mos Mairoum: la mappa si appoggia alla piattaforma open source Ushahidi, e consente un costante aggiornamento basato sulla mobilitazione degli utenti della rete, che possono segnalare posti di blocco etc. Qui è possibile seguire le segnalazioni anche via twitter: @MapMosMaiorum
Supportiamo la solidarietà, #StopRaids!